Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 180
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 369-376

Anticipatory Grief among Chinese Family Caregivers of Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Cross-Sectional Study


1 Department of Thoracic Surgical Oncology, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, China
2 School of Nursing, Peking University, Beijing, China
3 Department of Nursing, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, China
4 Department of Digestive Oncology, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, China
5 Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, China

Correspondence Address:
MSN Yuhan Lu
Department of Nursing, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing
China
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon-214

Rights and Permissions

Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the interrelationship between anticipatory grief (AG), caregiver burden, communication, preparation for death, and coping style. Methods: A convenience sample of 256 Chinese family caregivers of patients with advanced cancer were recruited from an academic cancer hospital between April 2018 and May 2019. This cross-sectional survey included the AG Scale, caregiver burden (Caregiver Reaction Assessment), communication (Caregivers' Communication with Patients about Illness and Death Scale), preparation for death, and coping style (Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire). Structural equation modeling tested the interrelation between them. Results: The final model fitted the data acceptably (χ2 = 25.79, degrees of freedom = 17, P = 0.08, root mean square error of approximation = 0.05, goodness-of-fit index [GFI] = 0.98, adjusted GFI [AGFI] = 0.95, parsimony GFI [PGFI] = 0.46, normed fit index = 0.94, comparative fit index = 0.98). Poor communication contributed to less preparation for death and caregiver burden, which further aggravate AG. Communication was positively associated with AG. In addition, communication and positive coping style interacted to further influence caregiver burden. Conclusions: Preliminary results supported the model and showed that poor communication, less preparation for death, and caregiver burden contributed to AG while positive coping alleviated AG. Findings suggest the need for further studies to explore effective intervention for communication, preparation for death, burden, and coping style of caregivers to ultimately alleviate AG.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed174    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded33    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal