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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 360-368

Rethinking the Meaning of “Wellness” for a Person with Cancer: A Qualitative Study to Explore What Elements Constitute “Wellness”


1 Department of Occupational Therapy, Princess Alexandra Hospital; School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
2 Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital; School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
3 Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia
4 School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane; Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health, Australia
5 Department of Physiotherapy, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia
6 School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane; Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health; Department of Speech Pathology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia

Correspondence Address:
PhD Jodie Nixon
Department of Occupational Therapy, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane
Australia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon-212

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Objective: This study explored what people with cancer and their family members define as wellness, and what they perceive to be the needs to support wellness during the cancer experience. Methods: This study utilized qualitative focus groups underpinned by an interpretative descriptive design. Participants included people with a cancer diagnosis having completed/currently undergoing cancer treatment, and/or family/friends. Participants were invited to share their experience and perceptions of cancer wellness, which was then mapped in relation to Hettler’s six dimensions of wellness. Results: Twenty-six participants (16 people with cancer, ten family/friends) were involved in the process. All six dimensions of wellness were reported by the groups with 19 descriptive content categories that related to these domains. The data revealed that people with cancer and family/friends have individual and diverse meanings of wellness. Participants offered suggestions for strategies to promote wellness relating to the environment and supportive care interventions. Conclusions: People with cancer and their families experience wellness individually. Cancer wellness models should consider the personal nature of wellness in relation to the six domains of wellness when developing wellness programs, including health professional access, an environment that supports wellness, the provision and access to reliable information, and support the key needs of being physically active and financial security.


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